In Blog, Most Popular, Agile & DevOps Testing

QA Blogs You Need To Follow

There is always more to learn when it comes to QA and software testing. From staying on top of the latest trends to honing your skills, QA blogs can provide great advice and insights.

While there are many great resources out there, it can feel overwhelming to know which thought leaders to trust when navigating the world of testing experts. To help you out, here are the top seven blogs that we think you should keep on your radar.

Joe Colantonio

A big believer in a full-stack approach to automation, Joe Colantonio’s blog delves into the different ways test automation can impact your QA team. He covers a wide range of topics, from DevOps to the way you set up and provision your environment. Through his writing, he focuses on how to incorporate automation into all areas of the software development lifecycle. In his podcast, TestTalks, you can also find his interviews with some of the biggest leaders in the testing industry. If you’re looking to invest in automation testing and performance testing tools, he writes product reviews on his blog as well.

Angie Jones

Angie Jones’ blog is a must-read for anyone who is looking to incorporate test automation into their software testing strategy. She writes about everything from industry trends in test automation and building a top-notch QA team. She also focuses on best practices and techniques, like how to build an automation framework that is agile-friendly. For those of you who are more hands-on, you can find her free test automation courses on the blog as well.

Eran Kinsbruner

If you like continuous testing, Eran Kinsbruner’s blog is a must-follow. He writes about everything related to this topic, with a focus on web and mobile applications. An industry veteran, his blog is also a great resource for dealing with each step of the application development cycle.

He’s a frequent speaker at global QA and testing conferences and guest writes for many different publications. Make sure to keep an eye out for his articles on the TestCraft blog as well!

Chris Kenst

If you’re looking QA blogs that offer a consistently updated list of software testing conferences and workshops, Chris Kenst’s blog is the place to look. An automation engineer for BloomNation, Kenst also writes about all things software development and testing. He’s passionate about teams achieving fast, “shippable quality” for their companies and offers many practical examples for doing just that.

Be sure to keep an eye out for his speaking engagements as well, including his upcoming webinar (with TestCraft). If you’re looking to learn how to conduct code reviews as a tester, this is the webinar for you.

The Friendly Tester

Richard Bradshaw’s blog, The Friendly Tester, discusses everything from automation testing to his own growth as a software tester. As the CEO (also known as “FriendlyBoss”) of Ministry of Testing, Bradshaw also offers unique insights into the software testing community at large. His mixture of testing tips and personal musings make this a great QA blog to follow. Make sure to also check out his “Whiteboard Testing” YouTube channel, which has videos on different software testing best practices.

Evil Tester

Contrary to what you might think, Alan Richardson did not name his blog “Evil Tester” in response to the “Friendly Tester” blog mentioned above. Rather, he sees “evil testing” as a fundamental attitude shift where testers actually take responsibility for how they test.  Instead of acting passively, Richardson believes that testers should own their processes and ways of thinking when doing software testing.

Unlike other QA blogs, Richardson focuses on this change in attitude, combined with skills overviews and other tips to approach testing in a more pragmatic way. This is the blog for you if you’re looking for professional advice coupled with some life lessons.

Satisfice

James Bach’s blog for his consulting business, Satisfice, focuses on different applications of his Rapid Software Testing methodology using the Context-Driven School (CDS) of software testing thought. Rather than focus purely on the rote formalization of technical work, this approach prioritizes skills and problem-solving. Coming from a programming background, Bach’s blog offers a unique outlook that appeals to both testing professionals and engineers.

 

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